Input needed on stent decision aid

I have a post up on e-patients.net (the Society for Participatory Medicine blog) discussing a draft decision aid that some PCORI-funded researchers are developing to help patients choose between bare metal stents and drug-eluting stents. Here’s an excerpt:

The study is in the beginning phase, and the researchers are engaging patients in focus groups to better understand what factors are most important to them in choosing a stent. The focus groups will also involve asking patients how they prefer the information to be presented (e.g., in words, graphs, some combination of the two, and so forth). Later, the decision aid will be tested at two hospitals to see if it improves patient understanding and satisfaction, and if the use of the decision aid changes the percentages of bare metal stents and drug-eluting stents received by the patients.

Dr. Chhatriwalla is very interested in getting feedback from patients and others on the current drafts of the decision aid (two different versions) and has asked SPM to help circulate them. You do not need to be a heart disease patient to participate — the researchers are interested in a wide range of viewpoints. Please take a look at both of them (posted below) and send your comments to Dr. Chhatriwalla at achhatriwalla@saint-lukes.org.

(Click to enlarge.)

DA-option-1-thumbnailDA-option-2-thumbnail

Making health care more patient-centered

I have a post up on the Assessment 2020 blog on how to increase patient involvement in medical decision making. I focus on shared decision making and argue that physicians need to develop certain competencies in order for the use of shared decision making to become routine and how certain structural changes can facilitate the process. Please read and add your comment!

My new Walking Gallery jacket

Thank you Regina Holliday, for painting this beautiful jacket!

Assessment 2020 blog

I am a member of the Assessment 2020 task force of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM). The task force is looking at how to improve the assessment of physicians for purposes of board certification. We are seeking to engage physicians and the public in a conversation about physician assessment, quality of care, and what skills physicians need to provide effective, safe, efficient, and patient-centered care.

We’ve started a blog and so far there are posts up by Harlan Krumholz and Richard Baron (introducing the blog), Bob Wachter (on diagnostic error), and Ben Chesluk (on teamwork). Please go take a look and let us know what you think.

New series of articles in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes will be publishing a new series of articles called narratives, which will be written by patients or by their family, friends or caregivers.

Narratives: The purpose of this series is to further understanding of patients’ experience of cardiovascular disease. These articles will be written by patients, or by their family members, caregivers, or friends. The articles will explore the effects of illness and treatment on patients’ lives and on their relationships with family, friends, caregivers, and health care providers. They will often discuss aspects of a condition that are important to patients but may not be fully appreciated by clinicians. We are especially interested in publishing narratives that contain lessons on the strengths and weaknesses of our health care system. They may, for example, be designed to help health care providers become aware of problems in communication of information, decision making, care coordination, access, cost, timeliness, safety, equity, and quality of care.

More information is available here. Submit your article here.

Perspective in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes

Recently, I joined the editorial board of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, the American Heart Association journal that focuses on quality of care and outcomes research. As my readers know, I became interested in cardiovascular disease because my daughter has heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disease that cause high LDL-cholesterol and can lead to premature heart disease. I wrote this perspective for the November issue on how engaged patients can help bring about positive change in health care.

Society for Participatory Medicine Tweetchat Series

The Society for Participatory Medicine is launching a tweetchat series this Saturday, Sept. 14 at 3pm EST. The chat will be led by Casey Quinlan (@MightyCasey); Ileana Balcu (@Yogileana); and Carla Berg (@Confluently).

SPM will be hosting a tweetchat on the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the month.  The second tweetchat will be Saturday, Sept. 28 from the floor of Stanford Medicine X, where a number of SPM members will be in attendance.

The first chat on 9/14 will focus on:

  1. What is participatory medicine?
  2. How has peer-to-peer healthcare impacted you?

Anyone interested in healthcare is invited to join in.

Go to tchat.io and plug in the hashtag #s4pm at 3pm Eastern this coming Saturday.

H/T Ileana Balcu

Addendum 9/14/13:  The transcript of the 9/14 tweetchat is available here.

BMJ: Clinical trial data for all drugs in current use must be available for independent scrutiny

In an impassioned editorial, BMJ editor Fiona Godlee calls on the pharmaceutical industry to release clinical trial data on all approved drugs, and on medical journals to publish industry-funded trials only when there is a commitment to make patient-level data available on reasonable request.  She states that the BMJ will require this commitment for all clinical trials of drugs and devices, whether industry-funded or not, beginning in January 2013.  In addition, BMJ is publishing online all correspondence between Roche and the Cochrane Collaboration researchers regarding the oseltamivir (Tamiflu) data.  More on the battle for Tamiflu data here.

Addendum 11/2/2012:  read Pharmalot’s coverage here.

BMJ editor: Open letter to Roche about oseltamivir trial data

In BMJ:

Roche promised in 2009 to release full reports from clinical trials of oseltamivir in response to an investigation by the BMJ and the Cochrane Collaboration.  In this open letter to John Bell, regius professor of medicine at Oxford University and a Roche board member, the BMJ’s editor in chief further urges the company to disclose the full data.

Read the full letter here.

Background here.

Ben Goldacre on missing data and publication bias

Ben Goldacre at Strata Conference

Here is a video of Ben Goldacre speaking at the Strata Conference in London earlier this month (H/T Chris Southan).

I also recommend his book, Bad Pharma:  How drug companies mislead doctors and harm patients, which goes into detail on how missing data and publication bias distort the medical literature and harm patients.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,315 other followers